Posted in home

Throughout pandemic, sickle cell patients suffer quietly at home

When emergency rooms began filling with people with Covid-19 in the spring, there was one group of extremely high-risk patients who were too afraid to go.



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People with sickle cell disease frequently need emergency medical care, but during the height of the pandemic, many suffered at home from fear of exposure to the coronavirus. The consequences of that hesitation are only beginning to be known.

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Emergency departments are “usually, unfortunately, our first access point when it comes to getting treated for pain and other complications” of the disease, Kyle Smith, 31, of Philadelphia, said. But “people with sickle cell disease were terrified to go, even though they were in desperate need of treatment for pain.”



a man wearing a suit and tie: Kyle Smith. (Courtesy Kyle Smith)


© Courtesy Kyle Smith
Kyle Smith. (Courtesy Kyle Smith)

Smith was just a baby when he had his first complication from sickle cell disease.

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Posted in remodeling

TL1A and its receptor could reduce fibrosis and tissue remodeling in patients with severe lung disease

Your lungs and airways need to be stretchy, sort of like balloons. Take a big breath, and they’ll open right up.

Damaged lungs can’t open properly. Patients with asthma, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and systemic sclerosis suffer from fibrosis and tissue remodeling, where a build-up of tissue and immune cells, and proteins that form a glue-like substance, keep the airways from expanding. As fibrosis gets worse, taking a breath feels like blowing up a balloon filled with concrete.

In a new study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) report that a protein called TL1A drives fibrosis in several mouse models, triggering tissue remodeling, and making it harder for lungs and airways to function normally.

“Our new study suggests that TL1A and its receptor on cells could be targets for therapeutics aimed at reducing fibrosis and tissue remodeling in patients with severe

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Continue Reading TL1A and its receptor could reduce fibrosis and tissue remodeling in patients with severe lung disease
Posted in remodeling

A step toward helping patients breathe deeply

IMAGE

IMAGE: A protein called TL1A drives fibrosis in several mouse models, making it harder for lungs and airways to function normally.
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Credit: La Jolla Institute for Immunology

LA JOLLA–Your lungs and airways need to be stretchy, sort of like balloons. Take a big breath, and they’ll open right up.

Damaged lungs can’t open properly. Patients with asthma, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and systemic sclerosis suffer from fibrosis and tissue remodeling, where a build-up of tissue and immune cells, and proteins that form a glue-like substance, keep the airways from expanding. As fibrosis gets worse, taking a breath feels like blowing up a balloon filled with concrete.

In a new study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) report that a protein called TL1A drives fibrosis in several mouse models, triggering tissue remodeling, and making it harder for lungs and airways to function normally.

“Our new study suggests that

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Continue Reading A step toward helping patients breathe deeply