Posted in home

Boy, 5, finds dead mum at home after she was ‘broken by lockdown’

Katie Simms, 32, with her son Archie (Picture: GoFundMe)
Katie Simms, 32, with her son Archie (Picture: GoFundMe)

A five-year-old boy discovered his dead mum at home after the coronavirus lockdown had “broken” her.

Archie found his mum Katie Simms, 32, unresponsive in their living room in Kettering on 28 September.

Katie had “shut herself away” after her older brother Barry Gunn killed himself in 2015, according to her sibling David.

Police have confirmed they’re not treating her death as suspicious and are currently preparing a report for the coroner.

Katie’s death is not being treated as suspicious (Picture: GoFundMe)
Katie’s death is not being treated as suspicious (Picture: GoFundMe)

David, 40, told Northants Live: “And I think Covid broke her to be honest.

“She couldn’t get to visit my mum, because she’s got breathing difficulties so couldn’t leave the house to visit.

“My dad was diagnosed with bowel cancer, he’s now got a tumour so can’t travel, so lockdown has basically broke us all.”

David said he felt

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Posted in home

‘Lockdown was madness at home but saved us financially’



a person wearing a hat and a body of water: Mum-of-three Paula says staying at home has been good for the family finances


© Paula A
Mum-of-three Paula says staying at home has been good for the family finances

The coronavirus pandemic has hit the global economy hard, but some people’s personal finances have never looked better.

Since the US shut down en masse in March, mum-of-three Paula, who lives in New Hampshire, has paid off some $20,000 (£15,270) in credit card debt the family had racked up in the aftermath of an unexpectedly expensive work relocation.

The 35-year-old’s job as an analyst ended in June, but her husband is still working and she benefited from a temporary $600 boost to weekly unemployment payments Congress approved in response to the crisis.

She put coronavirus stimulus cheques from the government towards the credit card payments, as well as thousands of dollars the family has saved since their children are not attending day care, preschool or summer camp. Already frugal when it came to eating

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Posted in home improvement storest

Kingfisher PLC profits go through the roof as COVID lockdown leads to home improvement boom

eCommerce sales represented 19% of group sales in the half-year compared to 7% a year earlier

() saw its profits and cash flow go through the ceiling in the first half of the year as demand for home improvement took off during the coronavirus (COVID-19)  lockdown.  

But while the group’s directors plan to repay UK furlough payments back to the government, provided another prolonged national lockdown is not forthcoming, there is no plan of reinstating the dividend yet. 

The DIY stores chain saw group sales fall by 1.3% to £5.9bn in the six months ended July 31, 2020, as like-for-like sales (LFL) dropped 1.6%, with growth at B&Q in the UK, along with the Poland and Romania businesses offset by declines in the UK’s Screwfix, both French chains, Russia, Spain and Portugal.

The second quarter from May onwards saw LFL sales rise 19.5%, with growth in all the group’s areas

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Posted in home repair

Americans stuck in lockdown are spending on home improvement

Lawnmowers priced at $3,000 are atypical bestsellers in recessions. But sales of the Ariens Ikon XD, featuring 20-inch tires, a V-twin Kawasaki engine and ergonomic plush seat, have surged in the U.S. during the pandemic.

While other industries grapple with a shaky economy, the home improvement business is booming. Home Depot and Lowe’s last week reported historically large rises in quarterly revenues as housebound Americans spend billions of dollars more than usual at the two go-to chains for DIY.

“Most of us are forced to spend more time at home than we ever have in our lifetimes,” said Marvin Ellison, Lowe’s chief executive, presenting a 34% jump in like-for-like sales. Customers had been “finding projects around the house” that they either “hadn’t had a chance to get to” or “just didn’t notice” before the lockdown.

Craig Menear, chairman and chief executive of Home Depot, said the pandemic had meant “the

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